Breaking The Rules

Any novelist who studies craft reads a lot about the rules: Show, don’t tell. Avoid adverbs. No head-hopping. These rules have developed to help us create fiction that welcomes the reader in, with no barriers to the reader’s participation in the story.

I recently reread Francine Rivers’s Redeeming Love, one of my favorite novels ever. The characters are real, believable, living and breathing on the page. The plot draws you from page to page with its unflinchingly honest, yet sensitively told, portrayal of the worst (and best) in human behavior. It’s an absorbing, life-changing piece of fiction.

But this time I realized that this novel breaks one of the cardinal rules. Read more.

Nancy

Writer Be Aware

If you are a writer, Writer Beware Blog is a good place to spend some serious time. It is informative and discusses issues writers need to be aware of. They are straightforward over there and dish on the latest publishing trends and scams. This article is a good one to read, especially if you have an agent or have been traditionally published. It is also a must read for new writers.

Earlier this week, I ran across a blog post by best-selling author Claire Cook  about the process by which she decided to become a hybrid author, ditching her high-powered agency in the process. It’s an interesting story–but what really caught my eye was this:

And then one day on the phone my agent informed me that in order to continue to be represented by this mighty agency, I would have to turn over 15% of the proceeds of my about-to-be self-published book to said agency. Not only that, but I would have to publish it exclusively through Amazon, because the agency had a system in place with Amazon where I could check a box and their 15% would go straight to them, no muss, no fuss. Learn more.

Nancy

An Interesting Read

This article provides an alternative view on fidgeting children.

A perfect stranger pours her heart out to me over the phone. She complains that her six-year-old son is unable to sit still in the classroom. The school wants to test him for ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder). This sounds familiar, I think to myself. As a pediatric occupational therapist, I’ve noticed that this is a fairly common problem today. Read more.

Nancy