Writers Need Encouragement

Here is an interesting article for writers.

I’m a member of several writing groups, and I’m always amazed at the different reactions people have to similar situations. For instance, one writer might leave a critique session in tears, questioning whether or not the call to write was real. Another writer might have just as challenging a critique and leave energized because she now has the insight she needs to improve. Learn more.

Nancy

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Writing the Antagonist

Writing the Antagonist

In criminal court, ascertaining motive or intent is an integral part of the legal process and sets the tone for sentencing. The determination of a person’s motive can mean the difference between the death penalty, life in prison, a long sentence, a short sentence, and freedom. In the same way, the bad guy’s motive in a mystery or a suspense novel sets the tone for the story. It can determine the difference between a page-turner novel and a put down never-to-finish novel. A villain’s compelling motive makes the hero’s job all that more important and the whole story more believable and more suspenseful. The villain’s motive sets the emotional atmosphere, it raises the drama quotient and it sets the stage for a brilliant finish. Learn more. Learn more.

Nancy

 

Time Management

I wanted to share a helpful article on time management.

We all struggle with time management, but as social media steals away more and more of our minutes, our angst over lost time grows. Here at Books & Such, we’re always brainstorming how to get to the “real” work. Our days are frittered away reacting (to emails, phone calls, social media) rather than initiating action.

When we’re merely reacting, we’re not engaged in the most productive work we should be doing. For example, it can feel good to clean out your inbox by the end of the day, but in actuality, did you engage in your highest priorities? Probably not. Learn more.

Nancy

Social Media

This article provides some helpful tips.

After launching my social media and online book campaigns, I decided to reach out to local libraries and schools about shelving my indie book. When they responded asking for my press kit, I panicked. But after doing quite a bit of research, I found that a) I already had most of the materials and b) it’s pretty simple.

Every press kit requires 8 main parts: Contact Information and Bio, Product Information, Promotional Information, Interview Resources, Media Reactions, Press Release, Book Excerpt, and Title Page.

Let’s start from the top. Learn more.

Nancy

 

Writing Through Difficult Seasons

There are seasons that are very difficult. This article provides writing tips for writers during hard times.

“I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, from whence cometh my help” (Psalm 121:1 KJV).

I stare out the living room window, my vision blurring and tears forming. I shuffle into the kitchen and peer out the back window. Perhaps the view from there would be different and change my situation.

It didn’t. My brother was still gone.

And I had writing deadlines. Learn more.

Nancy

Editors?

Here’s an interesting take on the need for an editor.

The short answer to the above question we most often hear is this: Yes. Every book needs an editor. And while Joe gave us a nice set of tools for self-editing last week, I’d like to take a moment to answer this question on a more philosophical level.

I spend a lot of time on Facebook. And one day I floated the idea that not every writer and every book needs an editor.

That’s right. I said it. Learn more.

Nancy

Critique Groups

Critique groups are a great place to learn and develop one’s writing skills.

With a new year facing us, now might be the perfect time to think about starting or joining a critique group.

The first thing to do is ask before you start or join is: what is the purpose of a critique group? What do I want this group to do, or not to do? If you are already involved in one group, perhaps you need to assess what that group does for you, and decide to accumulate a different group of writers with different skills. And if you aren’t already in a group, consider what you think you need the most. Maybe you need to join two groups to meet different needs. Learn more.

Nancy